Thursday, July 5, 2012

Color Affection Starts Tomorrow!

That's right - our Color Affection KAL starts tomorrow - Friday, July 6th, 2pm-ish. And judging from the diminished piles of Madelinetosh Sock, Madelinetosh Light and Malabrigo Sock stacked on the shelves, we think this is going to be a popular one!  (you might want to arrive early for one of those coveted seats around the yellow table :-)

One of the (very many!! in my humble opinion!) advantages to a knit-along is sharing tips and techniques. Based on my review of projects on Ravelry (oh my, more than 4,200?!!!), talking to folks who have knit this, and my own experience with garter stitch and short rows, I have just a few thoughts to share. Of course once we actually get into the knitting, I'm sure we'll have more.

First, many have asked about needle size and swatching. The pattern suggests a size 6 for the fingering weight size. I usually like a size 6 or size 7 needle for fingering weight shawls, so a 6 seems fine. And no, I'm not going to swatch - but if I were worried about having enough yarn, or if I thought I was a loose or tight knitter...I would.

Second, the most prevalent modification I saw on all those project pages was about the edge. And making it looser by adding a YO between the first two (knit) stitches on every row, and then dropping it on the next row (or some variation thereof, but the one I just described is by far the easiest!). If you want your finished shawl to have a crescent shape at the edge, I would knit the pattern as written. But, if - like me - you'd like to block that edge into a straight line, I suggest the modification. Yes, I'm going to do this.

Third, twisting the two (and then three) colorways along the edge so it's pretty. This photo tutorial shows the method I plan to use. It adds one more twist to the color change than I usually do (which is what Jared Flood described in his ever-so-popular Noro Striped Scarf).
twisted edge {one}

twisted edge {two}


twisted edge {three}


and Fourth (and finally), a reminder that short rows in garter stitch are easy. You just wrap & turn (think "move the stitch, move the yarn, move the stitch") and you're done! I also suggest hanging a locking stitch marker around that wrapped stitch (or placing it on the needle just before or after that stitch) so you can easily find it knitting back...and know where to start counting for your next wrap & turn.

...off to wind my yarn and cast on. Writing this post has made me lose whatever self-control I had about waiting til tomorrow to start!!

Hope to see you tomorrow!

2 comments:

  1. Thanks Mary - for the tips and including the graphic of the twisted yarn. So far some of my rows (on my test swatch) were neater than others. A technique that I am sure will be second nature before we get 25% into this shawl. See you at the Yellow Table!!!

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  2. Thanks Mary - for the tips and including the graphic of the twisted yarn. So far some of my rows (on my test swatch) were neater than others. A technique that I am sure will be second nature before we get 25% into this shawl. See you at the Yellow Table!!!

    ReplyDelete